Specs for Corvette Sting Ray 1963-67

Engine: OHV 90 degree V-8, 327 cid, 396 cid, 427 cid

Construction: Cast iron block and heads, single cam, pushrods

Compression ratio: 11:1

Induction: Rochester fuel injection or one or two Carter four-barrel carburetors

Maximum power: 250-375 hp (327 cid) 390-435 (427 cid)

Top speed: 152mph

0-60mph: 5.4sec, 427cid

Transmission: Four-speed, fully synchromesh manual, optional three-speed manual or Powerglide automatic

Body/Chassis: Steel ladder frame with fiberglass body convertible or two-door coupe

Wheels: Five-bolt steel (optional detachable aluminum) 6in. x 15 in.

Tires: 6.7 inches. x 15-inch Firestone Super Sport 170

Brakes: drums until 1965, then four-wheel discs

Front suspension: Double wishbone, coil springs, stabilizer bar

Rear suspension: Semi-trailing arms, semi-axles and wishbones with transverse leaf spring

Wheelbase: 98 inches

Length: 175.3 inches

Height: 49.8 inches

Weight: 3150 pounds

Quarter Mile Performance: 12.8 @ 112

Fuel Mileage: 9-16 mpg.

Production: 118,964 including 1963-67

Price: $4,240 for 1967 Convertible

Corvette Sting Ray 1963-1967

The second generation Corvette was the 1963-1967 Sting Ray, not to be confused with the third generation 1968-82 Stingray (1 word). The styling was the expression of many of the styling ideas of GM’s new chief of styling, Bill Mitchell. The interior implemented a crew cab similar to previous Corvettes, but updated for the Sting Ray. Beginning in 1963, the first hardtop coupe was offered, featuring a two-piece hatchback design. Bill Mitchell intended it to form a visual connection with the raised center sections of the hood. The feature was dropped in 1964 because it limited rear visibility. However, the 1963 Sting Ray coupe is now the most sought after model of the second generation Corvettes.

Like all Corvettes, the Sting Ray’s body is constructed of fiberglass panels mounted on a steel ladder frame. Another new feature was the hidden twin pop-up headlights, which not only added style but aided aerodynamic efficiency. Other styling cues from the Sting Ray include the optional side-mounted exhaust, a power hood bulge (this was wider for Corvettes that had the big-block engine), and the absence of a decklid (access is from behind of the seats). Plus, Corvette’s convertible top folds flat when not in use and stores under a recessed fiberglass panel behind the driver. There was also an optional hardtop. Sting Ray models of different years can often be differentiated by their side vent designs, for example, the 1967 had 5 side vents, the 1965 and 1966 models had triple side vents, the 1963-64 had dual horizontal vents.

Sting Rays came in three engine sizes, the 327 cid, the 396 cid, and the 427 cid. Horsepower ranged from 250 to 435 hp. The 396 engine was only offered in 1965 and was dropped in 1966 in favor of the 427. The 1967 L88 427 cid V8 marked the pinnacle of performance for the second generation Corvette. The V8 engines drive the rear wheels through either a four-speed manual transmission or a three-speed automatic transmission. The Sting Ray also had an alloy clutch housing and an alloy-cased gearbox to help with weight reduction and distribution. The 1963 Sting Ray was the first Corvette to have an independent suspension. The 1965 was the first to have 4-wheel disc brakes.

The 63 Corvette also had a racing option, the Z-06. The Z-06 was created by Zora Arkus-Duntoz as a purpose-built racer. The Z-06 option consisted of a fuel-injected 327 cid V8, 36.5-gallon fuel tank, heavy-duty brakes, heavy-duty suspension, and removable wheels. Heavy-duty brakes consisted of sintered metal-lined drums, assisted and backed by a dual-circuit master cylinder. The “elephant ear” blades pushed cool air into the drums, and the cooling fans rotated with the hub.

For 1967, there were four versions of the 427 available. The first version, the L36, was only $200 more and featured a single four-barrel carb, 10.25:1 compression, and hydraulic lifters. It had an output of 390 bhp. Next up was the L68 for $305 which featured triple two-barrel Holley carbs (a first for Corvette) and was good for 400bhp. At the top was the L71 with triple two-barrel Holley carbs, solid lifters, special performance cams and 11:1 compression that was conservatively rated at 435bhp. Extremely rare (only 20 built) was the top-of-the-line L88 for $948 more. The L88 featured new aluminum heads, 12.5:1 compression, and a single four-barrel Holley carb rated at 850 cfm that sat on an aluminum intake manifold with a special raised plenum. Also, it got a transistor ignition and positraction differential, but it didn’t get a fan shroud, heater, or defroster. Chevrolet was reluctant to reveal the engine’s true potential and officially rated it at just 430bhp, but most experts believed it was in fact close to 600bhp! In total, 9,707 big blocks were built, which means that 42.31% of all 1967 Corvettes were 427s. Transmission options were relatively simple. With the L36 and L68, buyers could choose between the wide-ratio ($184) or close-ratio ($184) four-speed manual transmission, or the Powerglide automatic transmission ($194). The L71 cam only with the four-speed close ratio. Rear end gear ratios ranged from 3.08 to 4.11. Other options included $132 side-mount exhausts, $263 bolt-on cast-aluminum wheels, and $232 removable hardtop for the convertible.

Statistics per year:

1963

Yield: 21,314

Court: 10,594

Z06 Cup: 199

Convertible: 10,919

Engines:
327 V8 250 bhp at 4400 rpm, 350 lb-ft at 2800 rpm.

L75 327 V8 300 bhp at 5,000 rpm, 360 lb-ft at 3,200 rpm.

L76 327 V8 340 hp at 6,000 rpm, 344 lb-ft at 4,000 rpm.

L84 327 (“fuel”) V8 360 bhp @ 6,000 rpm, 352 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm.

Performance:
327/370: 0-60 in 5.9 seconds, 1/4 mile in 14.9 seconds.

1964

Yield: 22,229

Cup: 8,304

Convertible: 13,925

Engines:
327 V8 250 bhp at 4400 rpm, 350 lb-ft at 2800 rpm.

L75 327 V8 300 bhp at 5,000 rpm, 360 lb-ft at 3,200 rpm.

L79 327 V8 350 hp at 5,500 rpm, 360 lb-ft at 3,600 rpm.

L76 327 V8 365 hp at 6200 rpm, 350 lb-ft at 3400 rpm.

L84 327 (“fuel”) V8 375 bhp @ 6200 rpm, 350 lb-ft @ 4600 rpm.

Performance:
N/A

1965

Yield: 23,652

Court: 8,186

Convertible: 15,376

Engines:
327 V8 250 bhp at 4400 rpm, 350 lb-ft at 2800 rpm.

L75 327 V8 300 bhp at 5,000 rpm, 360 lb-ft at 3,200 rpm.

L79 327 V8 350 hp at 5,500 rpm, 360 lb-ft at 3,600 rpm.

L76 327 V8 365 hp at 6200 rpm, 350 lb-ft at 3400 rpm.

L84 327 (“fuel”) V8 375 bhp @ 6200 rpm, 350 lb-ft @ 4600 rpm.

L78 396 V8 425 hp at 6,400 rpm, 415 lb-ft at 4,000 rpm.

Performance:
396/425: 0-60 in 5.7 seconds, 1/4 mile in 14.1 seconds at 103 mph.

1966

Yield: 27,720

Court: 9,958

Convertible: 17,762

Engines:
L79 327 V8 300 bhp at 4,800 rpm, 360 lb-ft at 3,400 rpm.

L36 427 V8 390 hp at 5,400 rpm, 460 lb-ft at 3,600 rpm.

L72 427 V8 425 hp.

Performance:
427/425: 0-60 in 5.7 seconds, 1/4 mile in 14 seconds.

1967

Yield: 22,940

Court: 14,436

Convertible: 8,504

Engines:
L79 327 V8 300 bhp at 4,800 rpm, 360 lb-ft at 3,400 rpm.

L36 427 V8 390 hp at 5,400 rpm, 460 lb-ft at 3,600 rpm.

L68 427 V8 400 hp at 5,400 rpm, 460 lb-ft at 4,000 rpm.

L71 427 V8 435 hp at 5,800 rpm, 460 lb-ft at 4,000 rpm.

L88 427 V8 430 hp at 5,200 rpm, 460 lb-ft at 4,000 rpm.

Performance:
L88: 1/4 mile in 12.8 seconds at 112 mph.

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